3 steps to make your training more efficient and more fun

I think that once you get into training, it suddenly seems so simple! But sooner or later everyone gets stuck and discovers that given the right skills it is easy, but it is not simple… Follow these three steps to make training more fun and effective for you and for you learner.

Continue reading “3 steps to make your training more efficient and more fun”

Help, my dog is a resource guarder! Part 2

Resource guarding (food, toys, etc.) is a common problem among dog owners. In the first post I talked about how we define resource guarding, what does it look like and what are the usual causes. Now we will discuss the options you have if your dog is a resource guarder:

  • management – making everyone safe again
  • emergency interventions
  • training

Continue reading “Help, my dog is a resource guarder! Part 2”

Help, my dog is a resource guarder! Part 1

Resource guarding (of food, toys etc.) is a common problem. It can crop up in rescue as well as purebred dogs, sometimes already when the dog is a puppy. I believe that the better we understand our dog’s behavior, the more effectively we can help them. In this post we will cover the basics:

  • What are resources and what is resource guarding?
  • What does it look like?
  • What causes resource guarding?
  • What factors influence the prognosis for behavior modification?
  • How can you prevent resource guarding in your dog?

If your dog already guards resources, read how to deal with it in the next post.

Continue reading “Help, my dog is a resource guarder! Part 1”

Giving meds to your dog

Giving pills to dogs (and other animals) frequently turns into a battle. Sadly, a lot of “advice” found on the internet calls for aversive methods to “win” it. You probably heard that one person should grab the dog, the other force their mouth open, push the medication in… I’ll spare you the rest.

Unsurprisingly, the situation gets worse and worse and in the end both dog and human hate it. As a result, owners start avoiding giving medication to their dog. And let’s not even talk about what happens to their relationship…

In this blog post I will share tips and tricks that will make giving medication to your dog if not fun, then at least much, much less stressful or all parties involved.

Continue reading “Giving meds to your dog”

The name game

Have you ever heard of the name game? You can use this game to teach your dogs:

  • that the treat comes after their name,
  • and that everyone will get their share,
  • so they don’t have to be impatient.

It also comes in handy when you have to wait around with a couple of dogs or if you want to distract them from something.

What does it look like?

Two or more dogs are around you:

  • four feet on the floor
  • they look at you or at the food

There should be no barking or whining. When dogs vocalize it usually means that the exercise is too hard and you need to modify it.

The order

  1. Say the dog’s name.
  2. Turn your body towards the dog and look at that dog.
  3. Give him/her the treat.
  4. If necessary use your body so that the dog standing next to the eating dog can’t disturb him/her

Repeat this process with each dog, then start from the top. Always change the order in which you call their names and don’t forget the release cue at the end!

Other tips

  • If one dog is especially impatient, start with him/her and treat them more throughout the game.
  • You can work with low value food. In group (“competitive”) situations food tends to gain more value and we don’t want to increase arousal.
  • In the beginning play fast. Once the dogs are familiar with the process you can start dragging out the time between each name.
  • If one dog is prone to stealing food or tries to chase other dogs away from the source of food, it’s worth working with a helper. At first this dog is treated by the other person (as a part of the game though) and you gradually decrease the distance, until he/she can be integrated into the group.

You can also play this game with one dog

Many dogs get frustrated around food (bark, lick the hand, mouth, whine) even when they’re alone. There are many possible causes for these behaviors, such as:

  • it’s unpredictable to the dog where and when treats are available
  • our use of event markers (clicker, verbal marker like “yes”) is inconsistent
  • our body language is confusing
  • we have not reinforced the behavior of “waiting calmly”
  • we take away the treats a lot (negative punishment)
  • the breeder fed all the puppies from one plate and the puppies learned to associate food with stress and frustration

Obviously you can’t solve this kind of a problem with one exercise, but the name game can be quite helpful here.

Meet Mr. X

Your dog is close to you, four feet on the ground, pays attention to you. Now there are only two players – your dog and Mr. X:

  1. Say your dog’s name, turn towards them and look at them, deliver the treat.
  2. Say “Mr. X.” (or anything else you like!), turn away from your dog and put a treat in a bowl or into your other hand.

At first it should frequently your dog’s turn and Mr. X gets treated only from time to time. Once your dog understands the game, you can increase the amount of treats given to Mr. X and start dragging out the time between each name.

Don’t forget to give the release cue at the end of the session and yes, you can give your dog all of Mr. X’s treats 🙂

thank you

To the Donau Dogs trainer Philip Engelman (first video). Check out their website for more dog training tips.